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How the mobile app SeeDoc is innovating telemedicine in India

In an attempt to connect patients with pre-screened doctors through video calls, two entrepreneurs in India have created an on-demand medical services a...

Admin
|Mar 10|magazine7 min read

In an attempt to connect patients with pre-screened doctors through video calls, two entrepreneurs in India have created an on-demand medical services app called SeeDoc.

Founded by Jaideep Singh and Vivek Bansal, the mobile app developed in New Delhi has been downloaded over 300,000 times and has had more than 15,000 video consultations since launching in November.

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The app currently has approximately 100 doctors with plans to expand that number to 1,000 by the end of 2016. Users are able to ask questions via text with no charge, while video consultations cost anywhere from 300-800 rupees (US$4.45-11.88) depending on the provider’s experience and location.

Doctors see around 30 patients per day via the app, as SeeDoc has handled as many as 500 video consults on its busiest day. The platform seeks doctors who have studied and trained at the top medial programs, and have 5-15 years of experience.

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“One of the key aspects of our business is to keep utilization of doctors high,” said Bansal.

In addition, doctors must be willing to use the app’s backend software to make certain they’re asking all the right questions to make a diagnosis, address patient concerns and refer them to pharmacies.

The idea came about years ago when Singh and Bansal returned to India with their families, and both quickly became frustrated with their country’s healthcare system.

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“We realized there is a huge gap in terms of providing good, transparent healthcare for families in India,” said Bansal. “There are various malpractices and little focus on providing good primary care.

“I wanted to see how we can apply our technology backgrounds to solve accessibility and transparency issues.”

Source: TechCrunch

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