Optometry's best opthalmic instruments

Written by Joshua Adams Working as an assistance under a certified ophthalmologist has had its own benefits and I sure have understood a lot about how...

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|Sep 24|magazine10 min read

Written by Joshua Adams

 

Working as an assistance under a certified ophthalmologist has had its own benefits and I sure have understood a lot about how eye specialists are able to give the best treatment to their patients. So many years of study and practice has given them the ease to handle with patients and their apprehensions on getting eye treatment done. There are also other things – instruments – ophthalmic instruments that are a huge assistance when it comes to treating complicated operations and are of extreme help to the doctor.

 

Below I am sharing some of the optometric equipment I think you should know about so that you are aware of what is treating you next time you visit your doctor:

Ø  Retinal Camera

The retinal camera is a specialized, low-power microscope equipped with a camera that has been designed to take pictures of the interior surface of the eye. This allows doctors to take a close look at the patient’s retina, macula, optic disc, posterior pole and other parts of the eye. Today’s retinal cameras are equipped with digital cameras that provide high definition photographs for doctors to examine. All of this data obtained from retinal cameras helps doctors/ophthalmologists to diagnose and monitor the advancement of the eye disease.

Ø  Photocoagulation Laser

A corneal cell counter is optometric equipment which is another type of advanced imaging microscope used by ophthalmologists to examine a patient’s internal eye structures. Unlike the retinal camera, however, a corneal cell counter employs advanced spatial techniques to render the images it takes as three-dimensional structures. Ophthalmologists can then use these 3D renditions to analyze and monitor diseases. Many of today’s corneal cell counters can also conduct automatic cell-analyses and other analytical functions to help detect ailments. 

Ø  Corneal Cell Counter

A corneal cell counter is another type of advanced imaging microscope that is used by ophthalmologists when they want to examine a patient’s internal eye structures. A corneal cell counter, however, employs advanced spatial techniques to render the images it takes as three-dimensional structures. Ophthalmologists can then use these 3D images to analyze and monitor any possible eye diseases. Many of today’s corneal cell counters can also conduct automatic cell-analyses and other analytical functions to help detect ailments for easy understanding. 

Ø  Wavefront Aberrometer

A wavefront aberrometer is a piece of equipment that combines different kind of imaging technologies, including pupillometry, keratometry, wavefront imaging, autorefraction and topography. The job of the wavefront aberrometer is to detect if there are any aberrations in the eye. The images obtained are displayed on an LCD screen at high-contrast, so that the aberrations can be easily zeroed down on and easily analyzed. 

Ø  Laser Ophthamoscope

I am sure you must have seen at least an ophthalmoscope. They are shaped very small, handheld devices that the doctors use to shine a light into your eyes during routine physical exams. The ophthalmoscope allows doctors to take a look on the inside of your eye to make sure it looks healthy. Laser ophthalmoscopes are advanced models of traditional microscopes that use laser light absolute detail and accuracy.

About the Author

Joshua Adams works as an apprentice for senior ophthalmologist and also has been assisting in eye surgeries. With a bachelors and masters degree specializing in the eye surgery arena, Joshua wishes to be a full time eye surgeon and an eye consultant.